I have dealt with overall muscle pain for several years and was finally diagnosed with fibromyalgia 6 months ago. Due to stomach issues, I am no longer able to take NSAIDs, and I don’t want to start down the opioid trail, so I’ve been pretty miserable. Most days I felt like I’d been hit by a truck, and by the end of a work day, I was done. Many evenings I had to use a foam roller on my neck, back, and legs before I could even think of going to bed, and just trying to sit and relax was sometimes impossible. My husband did a lot of research on CBD oil, and Medterra seemed to be a solid company with a good following. He got me a bottle of the 1,000mg tincture, and I “front-loaded” with two doses a day for the first 5 days, then went down to one 1ml dose each morning. Even though we were on a lake vacation and I was climbing in and out of the boat and bouncing around the lake, I noticed that the pain and achiness in my arms and legs was gone within the first couple of days. After a couple more days, I realized that the pain and tightness in my upper back/neck were nearly gone as well. I’m starting to get my “old” energy back, and I can focus on doing what I want to do without the pain constantly interfering. My next order will be for the 3,000mg tincture... I want to play with the dosing a bit and see if I can get some relief with lower back pain (unrelated to the fibro). If you’re dealing with muscle pain, I highly recommend giving Medterra CBD oil a try.
Well, yes and no. "Most companies only search for the cannabinoid THC. That said, there are some testing facilities that check for a spectrum of cannabinoids, and therefore, THC-free CBD products could trigger a positive result," says Sheri Kasper, RDN, LDN. "By law, you are allowed to ask the facility what cannabinoids they test for. If you are uncomfortable with that, you can call and ask anonymously." These super-sensitive tests are rare, however. Most of the time, employers just want to know if you're smoking weed all day, not if you're taking CBD for your anxiety.
CBD interacts with the body through the endogenous cannabinoid system (ECS) or endocannabinoid system. First discovered in the late 1980’s, the endocannabinoid system regulates the body’s homeostasis, or general state of balance, impacting such functions as mood, sleep, appetite, hormone regulation, and pain and immune response. Like an acrobat on a highwire, as the environment around us impacts our normal balance, the endocannabinoid system “corrects” by mediating our body’s reaction to keep us level.
This is great news for hemp farmers and consumers interested in CBD, an industry that’s predicted to hit $22 billion by 2022. However, the CBD market has all the makings of a wild west show, with many businesses anxious to get in on the action and make a tidy profit. As such, you’re likely to see CBD-infused products with prices all over the map. And with no official system of checks and balances, it will be hard to tell how much CBD is actually present or what quality it is.
One of CBD’s chief properties is its anticonvulsant nature. Clinical trials have shown that CBD is effective at reducing seizures in children, and the FDA is likely to approve Epidiolex, a pharmaceutical-grade version of CBD for this use, in summer 2018. Although CBD has been documented as an antiepileptic since 1881, CBD’s anticonvulsant mechanisms still remain unclear. Not enough studies have been conducted to understand this relationship fully. One possible explanation for CBD’s neuroprotective effects is its interaction with NMDA receptors, which play a key role in the overly active neuron activity that is a hallmark of epilepsy.
Regular weed comes from the cannabis plant, while CBD is derived from hemp. What's the difference? "The legal definition of hemp is a cannabis plant that has less than .3 percent THC in it," says Trista Okel, founder and CEO of CBD product retailer Empower Body Care. "That is the only legal differentiation between hemp and marijuana." All pure CBD oil will have less than .3 percent THC but will be full of the (alleged) anxiety- and pain-reducing properties.
The mosaic of laws that govern CBD legality across the globe varies just as much as the legislation across the US. Generally, CBD extract is legal in most countries, but what makes it illegal is where and what it’s extracted from. Most Group of 20 (G20) countries allow CBD extracted from industrial hemp, but not CBD extracted from whole-plant marijuana. Note, however, the differences between the two. Legislation regarding international travel with CBD also varies among countries. For the foreseeable future, the best practice would be to search online, or contact the respective embassies or consulates, before traveling to determine whether your CBD is safe and legal.

CBD

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