In addition to CBD, Cannabis sativa L contains organic compounds called terpenes. Terpenes are isomeric hydrocarbons (C10H16) used to create essential oils, balsams, and other by-products. When chemically modified through oxidation or other methods, terpenes become terpenoids (sometimes referred to as isoprenoids). Vitamin A is one example of a terpenoid.

The benefits of CBD and other non-THC cannabinoids don’t stop there. Terpenes and the wide spectrum of other chemical compounds found in hemp flower-bud extracts provide potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. And like most other herbs, hemp flower-bud extracts have been associated with antimicrobial properties, though cannabis doesn’t appear to be as strong an antimicrobial as many other herbs.
As mentioned above, cannabis and hemp differ in the levels of naturally occurring THC that they contain.  THC is a cannabinoid like CBD.  However, its properties are very different and often antagonistic to the effects of CBD.  Hemp is naturally high in CBD and low in THC; the reverse is true of cannabis.  In fact, hemp contains only about 0.3% – 1.5% THC, while cannabis contains about 5% – 10% or more THC.

Oral consumption is recommended as it usually lasts the whole night. Always start with the micro dose to test sensitivity and go up as needed within the dosing range before going to the next, until symptoms subside. The micro to standard dose is usually recommended to treat insomnia and sleep apnea. When relaxing indica strains are used with higher THC levels, a dose of 5–10 mg is usually sufficient. Other people find they need larger doses, such as 15–40 mg. CBD taken as a tincture or edible will aid in a restful six to seven hours of sleep. This type of disorder varies widely from one patient to the next. Often, one needs to perform some experimental research and try strains of different CBD:THC ratios to figure out how CBD oil benefits their sleep and the best protocol.

CBD Oil Full Spectrum

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